• Archives

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 21,921 other followers

  • Instagram

    Today, the United States spends $218 billion a year growing, processing, transporting, and disposing of food that is never eaten. Fortunately, there are a number of ways to reduce food waste.Click here to read IFT Achievement Awardee Edward Hirschberg’s solution for how we can address food loss due to poor transportation and storage. Link available in bio or copy/paste this link: http://bit.ly/IFTFoodWaste Today, we are celebrating women in science for International Women's Day! The International Women's Day is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. These particular five women have been at the forefront of some of today’s most complex and controversial scientific issues including genetic engineering and lab-grown meat. In addition to highlighting their work, these interviews explore the influence of gender in food and science. Click link in bio #IWD2017 #internationalwomensday #womeninstem #foodscience http://hubs.ly/H06wKB60 Roughly one third of the food produced in the world for human consumption every year — approximately 1.3 billion tons — gets lost or wasted. Fruits and vegetables have the highest wastage rates of any food. What can we do with spilled, wilted, blemished produce? Click here to read IFT Achievement Awardee Edward Hirschberg’s solution for bringing life back to the "ugly" lettuce. Link available in bio or copy and paste the following to view solution: http://bit.ly/IFTFoodWaste #Repost @hanna_instruments ・・・
The Hanna Texas team had a great time at @iftfoodscience's Lunch & Learn at @nasajohnson on 2/23. Hanna USA proudly sponsored this event featuring a talk by @nasa scientist Dr. Shannon Walker, a tour of the food lab facility, and behind-the-scenes tour of Mission Control! Thank you again to IFT and NASA for an incredible event.

In Defense of Food Science and Technology

The title of a recent article in Food Technology (December 2011, pp. 32–37) on “Cleaning up Processed Foods” should trigger negative reactions for any food science and technology professional. Although the title may be an attempt at being provocative, the implications of this title for an article published in Food Technology are very serious. In a societal environment with the image of processed foods being questioned almost daily, communications from IFT should contribute to a better understanding of food processing.

About 18 months ago, several IFT members devoted many hours to the development of a science-based paper on the history and status of food processing. This paper was published in the September 2010 issue of Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety (CRFSFS) [http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1541-4337.2010.00127.x/pdf (pdf)]. The goal of the review paper was to provide a reference to be used for future publications about food processing and processed foods. The December 2011 Food Technology article does not reference the CRFSFS paper, even though the title indicates that the article deals with processed foods. In addition, terms and statements within the article suggest that processed foods are unhealthy or unsafe.

The article makes no attempt to define a processed food or recognize that food processing represents a broad range of steps required to convert raw materials into safe food products. The article contains no reference to the role of processing in ensuring safety of the food supply.

In summary, this article seems to create more confusion about the role of processed foods in meeting the nutritional needs of a growing world population. Hopefully, more careful review of the title and content of future articles will occur before publication in Food Technology.

Dennis HeldmanDennis R. Heldman, Ph.D.
Past-President IFT (2006–07)
drheldman@earthlink.net

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: